Scadding Court Community Centre
  • Phone :

    416.392.0335

  • Address :

    707 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M5T 2W6

  • Email :

    scccinfo@scaddingcourt.org

SCADDING COURT COMMUNITY CENTRE CELEBRATES BLACK HISTORY


 

SCCC recognizes that every day is a day to celebrate Black communities. We start in February with #BlackHistoryMonth, and continue throughout the year to raise awareness and celebrate Black community achievements every day as part of our heritage, our current society, and the future of our country.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH: KID’S PAINT PARTY

In collaboration with Artist Saada Awaleh, SCCC will be hosting 2 paint workshops for kids ages 6-12 and youths 13 and up. Workshops are open to 12 children MAX and are on a first come-first serve basis. For more information or to register email Chase at chase@scaddingcourt.org

FEBRUARY 19 12:30PM – 2:30PM (6-12 YEARS) – IN PERSON AT SCADDING COURT
FEBRUARY 26 12:30PM – 2:30PM (13 and up YEARS) – IN PERSON AT SCADDING COURT

 

 

The 2022 Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario (ETFO) Black History Month Poster (artist Jibola Fagbamiye) is a visual representation of the importance of knowing your history, learning from it, and building on that knowledge to create a brighter future.

The poster features the portraits of trailblazers that are being celebrated because they have shaped Canadian society and the lives of the Black diaspora through their activism and political endeavours.  The use of Afrofuturism provides a glimpse into a society where the glass ceiling no longer exists.

As the Nelson Mandela quote captures: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

 


Scadding Court Community Centre proudly celebrates Black History Month every February, as a time to celebrate and remember all the ways that peoples of African Histories (Black Canadians) have contributed to Canada’s history and culture.

The UN declared 2015-2024 the International Decade of People of African Descent.

The history of Black History Month dates back to 1926 in the United States. At that time, an African-American historian named Carter G. Woodson founded a week that focused on celebrating the accomplishments of African Americans. He decided on a week in February because two important men were born in that month.

The first was Frederick Douglass, a former slave in the 1800s who spoke out for the freedom of slaves, as well as equal rights for women. The second was Abraham Lincoln. As the 16th president of the United States, Lincoln fought for the freedom of all slaves throughout the country.

Woodson’s idea began as a one-week celebration, it eventually became a month-long event called Black Heritage Month in the United States in 1976.

In 1995, Canada’s government officially recognized February as Black History Month. It was an initiative by the Ontario Black History Society and introduced to Parliament in December 1995 by Jean Augustine, the first Black woman elected as a member of Parliament. Black History Month was officially observed across Canada for the first time in February 1996.

A MESSAGE OF COMMITMENT AND SOLIDARITY

These are unprecedented times on so many levels, for all of us. Historical inequities have been surfaced and highlighted, both here, and across the world. We understand Covid is not the great equalizer. We are all uncertain of what the future holds. We feel, and are hurting, with our brothers and sisters, with our communities, with our families, with our friends and colleagues, with you. As those impacted, as allies, as those who will bear witness.

SCCC will double our resolve to act against anti-Black racism, against anti-Asian racism, against all racism, oppression and anything that threatens the values that we have built together as a neighbourhood, a community, a family.

Because of our communities, this organization has a long history of challenging unfair systems and ongoing relentless oppressions against our most vulnerable community members, often with others, sometimes alone. Our commitment will continue to focus on breaking down barriers that prevent our communities from achieving success and thriving.

Today we hurt, mourn, rage and reflect with our communities, and the city we serve. We will act together, as communities, as agencies, as individuals, and as collectives to change these systems that continue to hold communities back.

Let’s remain strong. Let’s reach out to one another if we need to. Let’s make Toronto a city that is fair, just, warm, welcoming and ready to act. Let us earn the Sanctuary City status we proudly wear. Let’s make sure every resident in Toronto is protected, assisted, and given the space to achieve their own potential. We commit to doing our part, with you.

To see our 2020 Deputation on the Police Budget to the Toronto Police Services Board, please click here.

To see SCCC’s own curated Our Canadian Story Project and Toolkit, a resource to learn about diversity and racism in Canada, please visit here.

CANADIAN HERITAGE VIDEOS:

Current Issues and Movements

To Learn More:

For Children

Government

Sources: CBC, Canadian Encyclopedia, Wikipedia, Government of Canada, Ontario Teachers Federation, NFB, Harriet Tubman Foundation